Entertainment

Entertainment

MoviePass Launches Annual Subscription Plan

MoviePass have launched a one year subscription plan for $89.95. Deadline reports:

For a limited time, MoviePass is offering a one-year subscription plan for a flat fee of $89.95, which translates to $7.50 a month (that price already includes a $6.55 processing fee). That price is under this year’s 3Q average movie ticket, which the National Association of Theater Owners pegged at $8.93.

Live Action ‘Star Wars’ TV Series Coming From Disney

Variety is reporting that a live action Star Wars TV series will be coming to Disney’s new streaming service:

Disney chairman-CEO Bob Iger announced the “Star Wars” news during the company’s quarterly earnings call. In addition to the “Star Wars” TV series, Disney is working on TV series adaptations of Pixar’s “Monsters Inc.,” the Disney Channel’s “High School Musical” franchise and an original entry from Marvel.

Rian Johnson to Create All-New Star Wars Trilogy

Star Wars:

Lucasfilm is excited to announce that Johnson will create a brand-new Star Wars trilogy, the first of which he is also set to write and direct, with longtime collaborator Ram Bergman onboard to produce.

As writer-director of The Last Jedi, Johnson conceived and realized a powerful film of which Lucasfilm and Disney are immensely proud. In shepherding this new trilogy, which is separate from the episodic Skywalker saga, Johnson will introduce new characters from a corner of the galaxy that Star Wars lore has never before explored.

Christopher Plummer to Replace Kevin Spacey in ‘All the Money in the World’

The Hollywood Reporter:

In a monumental and expensive move, Ridley Scott will remove embattled actor Kevin Spacey from his finished thriller All the Money in the World just weeks before the film’s release.

Christopher Plummer will now play J. Paul Getty in the story about the infamous 1973 kidnapping of his grandson, 16-year-old John Paul Getty III.

The movie, which was pulled as the closing-night screening of AFI Fest at Scott’s insistence, is scheduled to hit theaters Dec. 22 via Sony’s TriStar. As of now, the release date remains unchanged despite the reshoots, but insiders say that if anyone can pull off reshoots and still make the holiday release date, it’s Scott.

Woah. I’ve never heard of anything like this.

Anthony Rapp: Kevin Spacey Made a Sexual Advance Toward Me When I Was 14

Adam B. Vary, writing for Buzzfeed:

In an interview with BuzzFeed News, Rapp is publicly alleging for the first time that in 1986, Spacey befriended Rapp while they both performed on Broadway shows, invited Rapp over to his apartment for a party, and, at the end of the night, picked Rapp up, placed him on his bed, and climbed on top of him, making a sexual advance. According to public records, Spacey was 26. Rapp was 14.

Kevin Spacey responded on Twitter and used his response to publicly come out as homosexual. I think Richard Lawson said it best, “Coming out as a gay man is not the same thing as coming out as someone who preyed on a 14-year old. Conflating those things is disgusting. This expose the gay community to am million tired old criticisms and conspiracies.”

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Martin Scorsese on Rotten Tomatoes and Box Office Obsession

Martin Scorsese, writing at The Hollywood Reporter:

There is another change that, I believe, has no upside whatsoever. It began back in the ’80s when the “box office” started to mushroom into the obsession it is today. When I was young, box office reports were confined to industry journals like The Hollywood Reporter. Now, I’m afraid that they’ve become…everything. Box office is the undercurrent in almost all discussions of cinema, and frequently it’s more than just an undercurrent. The brutal judgmentalism that has made opening-weekend grosses into a bloodthirsty spectator sport seems to have encouraged an even more brutal approach to film reviewing. I’m talking about market research firms like Cinemascore, which started in the late ’70s, and online “aggregators” like Rotten Tomatoes, which have absolutely nothing to do with real film criticism. They rate a picture the way you’d rate a horse at the racetrack, a restaurant in a Zagat’s guide, or a household appliance in Consumer Reports. They have everything to do with the movie business and absolutely nothing to do with either the creation or the intelligent viewing of film. The filmmaker is reduced to a content manufacturer and the viewer to an unadventurous consumer.

He’s not wrong.

And as film criticism written by passionately engaged people with actual knowledge of film history has gradually faded from the scene, it seems like there are more and more voices out there engaged in pure judgmentalism, people who seem to take pleasure in seeing films and filmmakers rejected, dismissed and in some cases ripped to shreds.

Sounds a little like popular music criticism as well.

Apple and Steven Spielberg Bringing Back ‘Amazing Stories’

Apple and Steven Spielberg have reportedly agreed to a content deal to bring Amazing Stories back to TV:

The new deal pulls in the director’s production company Amblin Television, along with NBCUniversal, with plans to resurrect beloved 1980s fantasy/sci-fi/horror anthology Amazing Stories. The original series only ran for two seasons in the mid-80s, but racked up a fair amount of critical acclaim and fond memories, including a dozen Emmy nominations.

Harvey Weinstein Fired After NYT Report of Sexual Harassment

Famous movie producer Harvey Weinsten has been fired by the studio he founded, The Weinstein Company, in the wake of a New York Times investigation uncovering decades of misconduct:

An investigation by The New York Times found previously undisclosed allegations against Mr. Weinstein stretching over nearly three decades, documented through interviews with current and former employees and film industry workers, as well as legal records, emails and internal documents from the businesses he has run, Miramax and the Weinstein Company.

People knew about this for years and it took until now for something to finally happen.

J.J. Abrams to Remake ‘Your Name’

J.J. Abrams has signed on to produce a live action remake of the popular anime Your Name. MTV reports:

While anime fans have a reason to be skeptical following the recent unsuccessful live-action remakes of Ghost in the Shell and Death Note, it should hopefully ease some fears knowing that Genki Kawamura, who produced the anime, will also serves as a producer on this film.

Jordan Peele Developing Nazi Hunting TV Drama

The Hollywood Reporter:

Peele is set to executive produce the drama The Hunt, a 1970s-set Nazi hunter drama from Sonar Entertainment. David Weil is on board to pen the script and exec produce alongside Peele. A network is not yet attached; insiders stress the project is already drawing interest from several potential bidders.

Inspired by true events, The Hunt follows a diverse band of Nazi hunters in 1970s America as they set out on a quest for revenge and justice — tracking and killing hundreds of Nazis who, with the unconscionable help of the U.S. government, escaped justice and embedded themselves in American society.