Review: The Gaslight Anthem – The ’59 Sound

Gaslight Anthem - 59 Sound

Over the course of the past 10 years, few albums from the 2000s have stuck with me quite like The ’59 Sound. One of the undeniable truths of being a consummate life soundtracker is that most of your favorite albums end up being inextricably linked to certain periods of time. You play those records so much when they’re new to you that they become a collage of moments and memories from your life. It’s a beautiful thing when that happens, but it also tends to mean your favorite LPs eventually fall out of regular rotation, as you reach for new music to play that role for new moments and memories. Most of my favorite albums fit into this category. My other 2008 classics—records like Butch Walker’s Sycamore Meadows and Jack’s Mannequin’s The Glass Passenger—are albums I revisit only every month or two, not because I don’t love them, but because they hold so many pieces of my past self within their songs. Those albums could never be life soundtracks to me today, because they already played that role at such vivid and crucial junctures of my life.

The ’59 Sound is different. It’s the rare “favorite record” in my life that isn’t tied to any one specific moment or season or year. It’s a record that has grown with me over time, one that has meant a dozen different things to me from one year to the next. Where other records I loved back then have drifted more into the background, The ’59 Sound is a record I’ve played regularly—probably once every couple weeks, at least—for the better part of the past decade. A part of the reason is probably my initial indifference to the album. The ’59 Sound got a lot of hype in 2008, but my first listens told me it was something dated and backwards-looking: songs stuck in the past that didn’t have relevance to my present. (Note: this opinion is my worst first impression of all time.) Because I was never infatuated with this album like I was with many of the LPs that came out around the same time, I never “wore it out” in the same way.

Travis Scott Tops the Charts

Travis Scott has dethroned Drake as the number one album in the country this week:

The set — which was released Aug. 3 via Cactus Jack/Grand Hustle/Epic Records — earned 537,000 equivalent album units in the week ending Aug. 9, according to Nielsen Music. Of that total, 270,000 were driven by traditional album sales — the second-biggest sales week of 2018.

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Anthony Green on Music, Creativity, and Identity

James Shotwell sat down to talk with Anthony Green over at Substream Magazine:

He continues, “It was through trying to realize that similarity that I learned I was bipolar. And it was during the creation of that song when I was like, this song is about being okay with the fact that you’re paranoid. You know what I mean? Yeah, you’re paranoid, it’s okay, you have to fucking trust that it’s okay that you’re feeling this way because it all goes away. Even the good stuff. And so, it was intended to be a love song about a person and a romantic feeling, and it just ended up being almost a love song about being bipolar and that it’s okay. I wanted to call the record Bipolar Love Songs, but I’m thrilled I didn’t because it came out on the same day as that Kanye record where he makes a big deal out of it.”

Review: Dave Grohl – Play

Dave Grohl - Play

Does Dave Grohl ever sleep? The near 23-minute instrumental song, “Play,” features Dave Grohl playing all of the instruments and is chaotic enough just in its concept alone. The “album” itself was recorded at East/West Studios in LA with the audio recorded by Darrell Thorp. The project came together to help promote music education in schools (so hell yeah to Grohl for doing this).

I highly recommend using a nice set of stereo headphones to fully absorb this entire work of art, rather than streaming it through a crappy pair of standard earbuds. This massive prog-rock odyssey is tailor-made for Dave Grohl, and has all of his many influences rubber-stamped over this opus. That being said, Grohl is precise in mastering the art of changing tempos, styles, and genres and knows exactly when to crank it up, or turn it down. The composure he plays with on “Play” is nothing short of a masterpiece.

Review: Bad Rabbits – Mimi

Bad Rabbits - Mimi

Bad Rabbit’s Mimi brings you seven jams that are perfect for the summer. I’ve been a fan of the band for a while now and they continue to be consistently good. Even if you’ve never heard of the band before, Mimi isn’t a bad place to start. It instantly let’s you know that this band is looking to have a fun time with their music.

Not only do Bad Rabbits have fun, but they blend genres together in a way that flows well. In a way, this is a bit of an experimental album for them, too. All seven songs revolve around a character, Mimi. You see the progression of them meeting, struggling, and more throughout the record. In “F on the Job,” things don’t go so well for our storyteller as he finds himself (rightfully) in jail.