How YouTube Serves as the Content Engine of the Internet’s Dark Side

Joseph Bernstein, writing for BuzzFeed:

But it’s on YouTube where he really goes to work. Since Nov. 4, four days before the election, Seaman has uploaded 136 videos, more than one a day. Of those, at least 42 are about Pizzagate. The videos, which tend to run about eight to fifteen minutes, typically consist of Seaman, a young, brown-haired man with glasses and a short beard, speaking directly into a camera in front of a white wall. He doesn’t equivocate: Recent videos are titled “Pizzagate Will Dominate 2017, Because It Is Real” and “#PizzaGate New Info 12/6/16: Link To Pagan God of Pedophilia/Rape.”

Seaman has more than 150,000 subscribers. His videos, usually preceded by preroll ads for major brands like Quaker Oats and Uber, have been watched almost 18 million times, which is roughly the number of people who tuned in to last year’s season finale of NCIS, the most popular show on television.

New Feist Album in April?

The Huffington Post is reporting that Feist will release a new album in April:

Feist has been largely off the radar since the 2011 release of her award-winning album “Metals” and since the album’s subsequent tour came to a close the end of the following year. (Fans can expect her long-awaited follow-up in April as well as her vocals on the upcoming Broken Social Scene record.)

For Nextdoor, Eliminating Racism Is No Quick Fix

Jessi Hempel, writing at Backchannel:

Tolia was dining with his communications director, Kelsey Grady, when her iPhone alerted them to the story’s publication. They read the lengthy feature together. It alleged that white Oakland residents were using the “crime and safety” category of Nextdoor to report suspicious activity about their black neighbors. “Rather than bridging gaps between neighbors, Nextdoor can become a forum for paranoid racialism — the equivalent of the nosy Neighborhood Watch appointee in a gated community,” wrote Pendarvis Harshaw.

Bitter Pills Release ‘Night Season’ EP

After coming up as rivals in the Nashville music scene, Jordan Dickerson and Kyle Adams came together to form Bitter Pills. After years of touring in their own bands, as well as in bands such as From Indian Lakes, Artifex Pereo, and Settings, they settled into an old house just outside of Music City to write Night Season — an EP as dark as it is hopeful, and as heavy is it is catchy. The five song collection is the sum of two lifetimes worth of musical iteration. Drawing inspiration from mainstream heavy-hitters like Incubus and Nine Inch Nails, as well as beloved bands such as Thrice and Anberlin, the EP is a healthy balance of familiar sounds and boundary bending ambition.

The EP is out right now on iTunes, Apple Music, and Spotify.