New Coldplay Coming Soon?

The Daily Star is reporting that Coldplay will be releasing a new album next month:

Coldplay will make a surprise return with a new LP at the end of November – AND it’s the first part of a double header.

The quartet are said to be repeating the success of their Ghost Stories/A Head Full Of Dreams releases by dropping an arty LP first ahead of a more mainstream pop collection the following year.

An insider spilled: “The first album is the more experimental side of Coldplay, they probably won’t tour until 2020 when the next one arrives.”

Alex Gaskarth Talks With RockSound

Alex Gaskarth talked with RockSound about the latest Simple Creatures’ EP:

There’s some really cool ideas floating out there in the big folder of potential Simple Creatures music, but I think as we’ve continued to write, the ethos and the sound of Simple Creatures is becoming more defined. At first, we were just kind of swinging and trying a lot of different things, and part of that process was finding out the voice of Simple Creatures and what that is. Now we’re a lot more familiar with the kind of music we want to make for this, I think when it comes time to making more music, I’m sure we’ll go back and end up pulling from some of that stuff. But I think the idea of continuing to innovate and keep it new is what excites me most about this project, so I imagine that’s where we’ll go with it.

Pete Wentz Launches Ronin Brand

Pete Wentz has launched a new clothing and jewelry brand called Ronin.

Born out of the idea of wandering, a samurai without a master, and the free dreams that accompany facing the world on your own, Ronin is a jewelry line built for modern times. Founded in 2019 by Pete Wentz, the line focuses on simple, quality unisex pieces that externally project one’s inward creativity and individuality.

SuperM Top the Charts

SuperM have the number one album in the country this week:

The set, which was released via SM/Capitol Records on Oct. 4, launches with 168,000 equivalent album units earned in the U.S. in the week ending Oct. 10, according to Nielsen Music. Of that sum, 164,000 were in album sales.

Jim Adkins Talks with Alt. Press

Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World talked with Alt. Press about their new album:

You did some songwriting with Sam Hollander (Panic! At The Disco’s “High Hopes,” Fitz And The Tantrums’ “HandClap”) for this album. Even though those songs didn’t make the cut, was that a way to avoid stasis—to get in a room with a stranger, be vulnerable and try to approach writing from a different creative place?

I wouldn’t entirely count those songs out yet, but we didn’t end up finishing them for this record. It’s fascinating to me: I love the craft of it. Everybody approaches it a different way. Everybody has a different kind of aural tradition of how they figured it out or was taught to them. The same thing goes for people who produce records: Everybody makes records a little bit differently. When you get the chance to work with somebody else, you learn so much.

Chris Farren Talks with MTV

Chris Farren talked with MTV about his recent album:

Regardless, Farren still wanted to make a solo record, and he wanted to be the one who recorded it. “I was sick of paying somebody $10,000 to be mean to me,” he says only half-jokingly. Perhaps it should’ve been expected given lines of his like, “Why can’t I bear to be alone with myself?” (2016’s “Say U Want Me”) and “I hope you never see me like the way I see myself,” (Born Hot’s opener, “Bizzy”), but Farren’s chronic insecurities are woven into the fabric of his musical history. He was so nervous about how people would react to his independent work that he decided to make his debut a Christmas album (and donate all the money to charity) in order to protect himself from negative criticism.

James Blake Pens Essay on Depression and Privilege

James Blake has penned a new essay about mental health titled, “How can I complain?

It’s especially easy to poke fun at the idea that a white man could be depressed. I have done it myself, as a straight white man who was depressed. In fact, I still carry the shame of having been a straight white man who’s depressed and has experienced suicidal thoughts. And still, when discussing it with most people, I will play down or skirt around how desperately sad I have been; instead I emphasize how much happier I am now. I emphasize the work I had to do to get to a better place, and how it was hard work and fruitful work, and how I empowered myself by doing it. I usually focus on how I regained control and an enthusiasm for living (‘Nice one, mate!’), not on how I lost it. That is the last of my defensiveness.