The iOS 13 Bible

Federico Viticci’s incredibly detailed review of iOS 13 was released today:

Amidst a deluge of new features and design updates, iOS 13, more than its predecessors, makes clear that Apple doesn’t consider iOS just an operating system anymore: it’s the platform upon which the company can build other experiences. In a way, the modern iOS is to Apple devices what Mac OS X was to the original iPhone: a stable technological foundation, ready to be taken in new directions.

No one is writing more in-depth and helpful reviews of iOS and iPadOS these days. And I don’t say that just because there’s some really good bookmarks and screen shots in the Safari section.

Fender Announces New Non-Profit

Fender has launched a new non-profit with various musicians, including Brendon Urie, Pete Wentz, and Avril Lavigne, to raise money for musical educational institutions and organizations.

Fender Play Foundation works with organizations, educators and artists to support communities through equipment donations, personalized instruction and artist experiences. Operating under the belief that music is the universal language that empowers self-expression and community building everywhere, the Fender Play Foundation strives to place these powerful tools in the hands of youth who aspire to play.

What We Know About Jimmy Eat World’s Upcoming Album

Various retailers have had a new album from Jimmy Eat World pop-up called Surviving and due out October 18th. There’s also a new interview with Jim Adkins in Kerrang! talking about the album:

And this is the first time he’ll be do­ing so with any­one any­where about the ev­er­green quar­tet’s new al­bum, Sur­viv­ing (due out on Oc­to­ber 18 via The Or­chard/rca). You can’t half tell, as the front­man ex­cit­edly rattles through the in­spi­ra­tions, mean­ings and the se­crets be­hind the lat­est col­lec­tion of songs he and the band have poured ev­ery ounce of their ev­ery­thing into. It turns out there’s a lot to learn, as Jim gets into the core of the record’s pol­i­tics, its themes of hope and hope­less­ness, the un­der­ly­ing in­se­cu­ri­ties that in­form its out­look and ev­ery­thing from high-con­cept phi­los­o­phy to sax­o­phone so­los. The black cof­fee is very much re­quired for this one…

Amazon Music Launching Lossless Streaming Tier

Amazon Music is rolling out a new lossless streaming tier.

Amazon is launching a new tier of its music service today, dubbed Amazon Music HD. It offers lossless versions of audio files for streaming or downloading at a price that aggressively undercuts Tidal, the main competition for this kind of audio. Amazon will charge $14.99 a month for the HD tier, or $12.99 if you’re an Amazon Prime customer. Tidal’s Hi-Fi plan costs $19.99 monthly. The new plan was rumored a few months ago.

Sum 41 to Play ‘Chuck’ in Full on Upcoming Tour

Deryck Whibley of Sum 41 talked with Alt. Press about playing Chuck live on their upcoming tour:

It’ll be our longest, for sure. I think they’ll be two-hour sets. Not sure if it’s going to be 2:05 exactly, but definitely two hours. The good thing about those two is that they’re relatively shorter records, so it makes sense to play them at one show.

The thing is, we never played every single one of those songs before. Some of those songs we’re going to be playing, we’ve never played ever. There’s maybe a good four or five songs we’ve never gotten around to playing when the album came out. So yes, you are learning stuff. But there’s also the brand-new record: We’ve never played a lot of those songs off Order In Decline; they were built in the studio, but live is a whole different thing. What I’m trying to say is, there’s a lot of rehearsing going on.

Billie Joe Armstrong Talks New Green Day Album

Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day talked with Kerrang a little about the band’s upcoming album:

Trump gives me diarrhoea (laughs), you know? I don’t want to write a song about it!

It’s just more about trying to empathise with people’s situations. It’s just a crazy time. When I was a kid, my parents had six kids. My dad was a trucker and my mother was a waitress, and they bought a home in California in the ’70s with five kids living in the house. That is an impossible thing to do right now in California – if not in other places. And that’s what scares me a little bit more – what’s going to happen to people in the future.

Taylor Swift: The Rolling Stone Interview

Brian Hiatt, writing for Rolling Stone:

She wants to talk about the music, of course, but she is also ready to explain the past three years of her life, in depth, for the first time. The conversation is often not a light one. She’s built up more armor in the past few years, but still has the opposite of a poker face — you can see every micro-emotion wash over her as she ponders a question, her nose wrinkling in semi-ironic offense at the term “old-school pop stars,” her preposterously blue eyes glistening as she turns to darker subjects. In her worst moments, she says, “You feel like you’re being completely pulled into a riptide. So what are you going to do? Splash a lot? Or hold your breath and hope you somehow resurface? And that’s what I did. And it took three years. Sitting here doing an interview — the fact that we’ve done an interview before is the only reason I’m not in a full body sweat.”