Taylor Swift Outsold Every Other Album on the Billboard 200 Combined

Brittany Hodak, writing at Forbes:

Reputation sold north 1.2 million units in its first measured week. The other 199 albums on the Billboard 200 combined sold only 723,000 units when streaming consumption and song sales are excluded (only four tracks from Reputation are available on streaming services). That means for every 10 albums sold last week, more than six of them were Reputation.

When streaming and digital track sales are included, Reputation still accounts for more than a third of all music consumption in the United States last week.

Sum 41 Talk “Still Waiting” Video 15 Years Later

Deryck Whibley of Sum 41 talked with MTV about the making of their video for “Still Waiting” and poking fun at The Strokes:

“Everyone else had kinda disappeared, and it’s now like 9 in the morning, so it’s one of those kinda parties,” Whibley said. “Julian and I [were] in the lobby drinking, and I just told him, ‘We got this idea for this video. What do you think? Do we have your blessing or do you hate it?’ And he was dying laughing. He goes, ‘Please do it! You have to do it.’ So we said, alright, cool, we have his blessing.”

“The way we looked at it was how quickly genres can come and go, and you can be the It band of a genre, and all of a sudden, a year later, it’s a whole new thing,” Whibley said. “That’s why the intro was so important to us because it set up that we’re making fun of ourselves. We’re irrelevant now because of all these new bands that are the new cool thing.”

MoviePass Launches Annual Subscription Plan

MoviePass have launched a one year subscription plan for $89.95. Deadline reports:

For a limited time, MoviePass is offering a one-year subscription plan for a flat fee of $89.95, which translates to $7.50 a month (that price already includes a $6.55 processing fee). That price is under this year’s 3Q average movie ticket, which the National Association of Theater Owners pegged at $8.93.

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The Specific Betrayal of Brand New

Zoe Camp, writing for The Outline:

There are those desperately searching for an argument that will let them reconcile their love of Lacey’s art with the admitted events, or offering limp defenses of his actions by noting that of course a teen girl would want to exchange flirty photos with a rock star, never mind the myriad reasons why a grown man is supposed to know better. (Equally toxic have been the invocations of Lacey’s mental health as excuses for his indiscretion, suggesting that he just couldn’t help himself.)

And:

The bleeding heart angst of emo’s singers leaked down to its boy fans; just ask any female emo fan about her experience with the men who treated them worse than the jocks they supposedly despised for being uncouth. It’s depressingly unsurprising now when a powerful man is revealed as having acted shittily toward the women around him, and less so when he comes from an environment as male-focused as emo – even when it’s somebody who was supposed to be as thoughtful as Lacey.

There’s been a swath of these articles written today and I recommend reading them all. Over the past few days I’ve received countless emails and messages from people wanting to talk about the rot at the heart of our music scene. I’ve heard from people who were abused by some of the more well-known frontmen in the scene, but aren’t ready to come forward yet. And I’ve heard from many that are. We, as a community, are going to need to face all of this head-on and come to terms with our own culpability as well.

I also want to say I am extremely disappointed that Brand New (with or without Jesse’s name attached) have not come out and asked their fans to not harass the women that have come forward with their stories. This has led to conspiracy theories spreading, harassment, and some truly disgusting behavior. Bands, labels, and all those associated with artists or celebrities need to know that part of their job when something like this comes out into the open is to make sure they’re active in the process. You can’t be silent while someone is re-victimized and think you’ve taken the moral high-ground. I believe it’s important to use your power and platform for good, and healing, not just when you want to sell records.

The End of the Emo Era Is Breaking My Teenage Heart

Shannon Keating, writing for Buzzfeed:

As a 15-year-old, if I had been approached by the lead singer of a band I believed had saved my life, there’s no telling what I would have done for him, had he asked. He and other punk-rock icons stared out at me from my bedroom walls every day, where I’d obscured my pathetically girly cloud-swirled blue wallpaper with posters and photo spreads from the Alternative Press. Lacey was my hero. I have a feeling I would have given him anything he wanted.

Like Garey, like every teenager, I was a know-it-all who thought I was a grown-up, so I wouldn’t have recognized that kind of behavior for what it was. But I also believed, at 15, that emo boys — and men — were different from “regular” guys. Emo guys were, yes, “emotional,” and introspective, and artistic, and they imbued everything with the kind of emotional weight I did as a shitty-poetry-writing teen