Review: Mineral Girls – This Is the Last Time Every Time

Mineral Girls - This Is the Last Time Every Time

There’s very little solace to be found in Mineral GirlsThis Is the Last Time Every Time. The world the characters inhabit is an indifferent – if not outright cruel – one to be certain, but most of the anguish on display here comes from inside. “I’m not trying to get any better / I’m just trying to make it look like I am,” becomes something of a mantra for the record.

This Is the Last Time Every Time is an appropriate title for an album as concerned as this one is with trying to change. The title of the opener (from which comes the above lyric) is “Let’s Talk About Us,” after all. And the song is just as cathartic as it sounds. See, for all the intensity behind the lyrics, the band behind them matches it pound for pound. For the most part, they’ve ditched the fuzz from Cozy Body in favor of a rougher, more straightforward emo sound. “The Bruise on We” begins with a Mineral-style riff, building and building to a post-hardcore climax, complete with harsh shrieks. It’s the only moment like it on the album, but it feels totally necessary. Elsewhere, like the title track, the band introduces electronics into their sound.

Zebrahead to Announce Compilation Album

Zebrahead will be releasing The Bonus Brothers, a compilation album, on November 24th. The album will contain a variety of songs that were previously only available in Japan. The band have also announced they’re currently working on a new album:

We have been recording the new album and are getting to the point where we can say we are “ALMOST” done. In December, we will start releasing studio recording videos with snippets of new songs…….excited and nervous for you guys to start hearing some of these songs.

Sponsor

Fall Out Boy Finish Album

Pete Wentz confirmed in a recent interview that Fall Out Boy are currently mixing their new album:

We’re done recording, officially! Which is pretty awesome. We’re just in the mixing stages now. Now, we’re just mixing and mastering the songs, which is really exciting. This didn’t seem like a place we could get to six months ago. It’s really cool to be here. We finished recording, maybe last week.

The Mathematical Genius of Auto-Tune

Zachary Crockett, writing at Priceonomics:

But often lost in this narrative is the story of the invention itself, and the soft-spoken savant who pioneered it. For inventor Andy Hildebrand, Auto-Tune was an incredibly complex product — the result of years of rigorous study, statistical computation, and the creation of algorithms previously deemed to be impossible.

Hildebrand’s invention has taken him on a crazy journey: He’s given up a lucrative career in oil. He’s changed the economics of the recording industry. He’s been sued by hip-hop artist T-Pain. And in the course of it all, he’s raised pertinent questions about what constitutes “real” music.

Review: Travis Meadows – First Cigarette

When Travis Meadows sings about hitting rock bottom, you can tell he’s been there. There’s a rawness and pain in his voice that tells you he’s not just playing a character or weaving a narrative. His songs ache with the scars of a hard life. As a child, Meadows’ younger brother drowned, his parents got divorced, and he ended up the odd man out between a mother and a father who started new families and moved on without him. At 14, he was diagnosed with cancer. He survived the disease, but lost his right leg in the battle. Eventually, he turned to alcohol as a crutch. He was already writing songs, and already had a publishing deal in Nashville, but he was such a mess that no one would agree to write with him. It took four trips to rehab before he could make sobriety stick.

Meadows has been off the bottle since 2010. In the interim, songs he’s written have been cut by Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, and Jake Owen—three of the biggest male stars in country music right now. His songs, though, remain haunted by his past. In a recent profile for Uproxx.com, Meadows said that he uses songwriting to admit the secrets about himself that he’s too scared to say out loud. That honesty radiates through First Cigarette, Meadows’ second full-length album and the most starkly intimate LP that anyone has made this year.