Frank Turner

Frank Turner on Latest Dialog Podcast

Frank Turner is the latest guest on the Dialog podcast:

We also trace Turner’s early years of constant touring and how he’s managed to find the time to write new songs and books while on tour. We talk about social media’s dual nature as a useful tool and destructive force in society too; a topic that has become a common theme among Dialog guests. Finally, we touch on the evolving music industry and how it’s affected Turner’s career as a musician.

Frank Turner Didn’t Clear The Armed’s Use of His Music

Frank Turner has responded to the new song from The Armed saying he did not clear the use of his music:

I can see a connect because I demo’d that song with Kurt Ballou once upon a time. Don’t really care about the obvious provocateur stuff (pretty funny really, including pic of @frankcarter23) but not very stoked about recordings getting used like that.

The band responded to Stereogum:

In a statement to Stereogum the Armed respond, “It saddens us to hear that he’s upset about the song. We’ve been big fans of Gallows for a long time.” (Frank Turner wasn’t in Gallows; Frank Carter was.)

Frank Turner Talks Beer as Well

While posting the previous article, I noticed that Frank Turner also talked with October. The beer stuff is cool, but this section stood out to me:

What I feel that the record is chiefly about is that we’ve collectively forgot how to conduct our disagreements in a civil fashion. The whole point of the game of politics is to try to find a way that we can conduct our disagreements in a civil fashion.

I think that’s one of the main reasons I haven’t been able to connect with Frank’s recent album. The disagreements are over putting kids in cages, women’s rights, trans-rights, unchecked police killing, massive corruption and handouts to the richest people and corporations, a grotesque sexual predator man-baby in the White House, and countless other atrocities that occur on a daily basis. I’m angry about it and I don’t find any value in “civil disagreements” with those that want to deny people their human rights.

Review: Frank Turner – Be More Kind

Be More Kind

It’s almost difficult to dislike an album as inherently positive as Be More Kind. In today’s draining political and cultural climates, Frank Turner not only believes that change is possible, but that it begins within each of us. In fact, if there’s an overarching criticism to be made about the album, it’s that these songs tend to veer into the brand of vague optimism that’s better employed lining the inside of Hallmark cards. But sometimes, even those messages can be refreshing to hear, and considering the relatively low energy on display, Turner’s heart, technical ability, and good intentions carry Be More Kind a considerable distance.

Frank Turner Talks With NME

Frank Turner sat down with NME to talk about his upcoming album:

I always try and have a different mental approach to each record that I make. The last album that we did was sonically and stylistically a bit of a retrenchment, a bit of an attempt to restate first principles, and I liked it, I’m really proud of that record. We cut the record in nine days with a live band and it’s quite stripped back and lean, but now it’s absolutely different. And it’s my seventh album, I feel like I’ve earned the right to expand my sonic boundaries and possibly a duty to as well. There are people in this world who want me to remake ‘Love Ire & Song’ every two and a half years and they are going to be disappointed, but at the same time I’m not taking Love Ire & Song’ away from them.