Yellowcard Suing Juice WRLD

Yellowcard

Chris Eggertsen, writing at Billboard:

According to a complaint filed Monday (Oct. 21) in U.S. District Court in California, former Yellowcard members William Ryan Key, Peter Michael Mosely, Longineu Warren Parsons and Sean Michael Wellman-Mackin allege Juice WLRD and his collaborators copied “melodic elements” from their 2006 song “Holly Wood Died” for the rapper’s blockbuster 2018 single without permission. They’re asking for damages in excess of $15 million and a “running royalty and/or ownership share” on all future exploitations related to the song or, alternatively, statutory damages “for each act of copyright infringement” and for defendants to be “permanently enjoined” from exploiting “Lucid Dreams” in the future.

And:

Yellowcard’s attorney, Richard Busch, issued a statement about the lawsuit in which he explained, “This was not a lawsuit the guys wanted to file. They put all of the parties on notice a long while ago and gave them every opportunity to try to resolve it. That notice was pretty much ignored leaving them with no real choice. As alleged in the Complaint, this is not just a generic Emo Rap song, but is a blatant copy of significant original compositional elements of Holly Wood Died in several respects. Beyond that, everything we have to say is in the Complaint.

Icelandic Rock Band Sigur Ros Charged With Tax Evasion

Sigur Ros

Associated Press:

Members of the Icelandic avant-garde rock band Sigur Ros have been charged with tax evasion three years after authorities launched a probe of the group’s finances.

An indictment issued by the district prosecutor Thursday accused the prominent musicians of submitting incorrect tax returns from 2011 to 2014, evading a total of 151 million Icelandic Krona ($1.2 million).

Music Labels Sue Charter, Complain That High Internet Speeds Fuel Piracy

Legal

Jon Brodkin, writing at Ars Technica:

The music industry is suing Charter Communications, claiming that the cable Internet provider profits from music piracy by failing to terminate the accounts of subscribers who illegally download copyrighted songs. The lawsuit also complains that Charter helps its subscribers pirate music by selling packages with higher Internet speeds.

While the act of providing higher Internet speeds clearly isn’t a violation of any law, ISPs can be held liable for their users’ copyright infringement if the ISPs repeatedly fail to disconnect repeat infringers.

Fall Out Boy Is Sued for Overuse of Llama Puppets in Videos, Marketing

Fall Out Boy

Jonathan Stempel, writing at Reuters:

Fall Out Boy was sued on Friday by a stuffed animal company that accused the rock band of illegally exploiting the wearable, life-sized llama puppets it made for a music video by featuring them in other videos, a tour and an extended-play album.

In a complaint filed in Manhattan federal court, seeking damages its lawyer said could reach millions of dollars, Furry Puppet Studio Inc said Fall Out Boy did not have permission to use the puppets anywhere other than its 2017 video for its song “Young and Menace.”

Now that’s a title I never expected I’d write.

Copyright Office Refuses Registration “Carlton Dance”

Legal

Eriq Gardner, writing at Hollywood Reporter:

The U.S. Copyright Office is skeptical about Fresh Prince of Bel-Air actor Alfonso Ribeiro’s ownership claim over the signature “Carlton Dance,” which became famous after a 1991 episode of the Will Smith series. […]

Take-Two Interactive, publisher of the game NBA 2K, is now seizing upon the refusal in support of the argument that movements for the “Carlton Dance” are not protectable. Ribeiro is suing Take-Two as well as the publisher of Fortnite over special features that allow game players to have their avatars perform the dance.

Netflix’s ‘Black Mirror: Bandersnatch’ Leads to “Choose Your Own Adventure” Trademark Lawsuit

Legal

The Hollywood Reporter:

Chooseco, LLC, the childrens’ book publisher that owns the trademark to “Choose Your Own Adventure,” has filed a lawsuit against Netflix over the immersive film, Black Mirror: Bandersnatch.

According to a complaint filed in Vermont federal court on Friday, Chooseco has been using the mark since the 1980s and has sold more than 265 million copies of its Choose Your Own Adventure books.

Skrillex Loses Injury Lawsuit

Skrillex

TMZ is reporting that Skrillex owes a fan over a million dollars:

A jury just awarded Jennifer Fraissl a whopping $4,525,402 in her lawsuit against the DJ, in which she claimed she suffered a stroke after he pulled a stunt at one of his concerts. Skrillex himself was found to be responsible for 35% of the damages awarded by the jury … roughly $1.6 million.

Spotify Sued for Gender Discrimination

Gene Maddaus, writing at Variety:

A female sales executive sued Spotify on Tuesday, alleging that the head of sales took his staff on drug-fueled “boys’ trips” to the Sundance Film Festival, and excluded women who were better qualified.

Hong Perez filed suit in New York Supreme Court, accusing the streaming company of systemically discriminating against female employees. Perez alleges that her boss, Brian Berner, selected an all-male group to attend Sundance in 2016 and 2017, and that some of the men got into a physical altercation during one of the trips.

Travis Barker Says Nerve Damage Caused by Medical Malpractice

Travis Barker

TMZ:

In the lawsuit — obtained by TMZ — Barker claims in June he went to The Medical Imaging Center in Santa Monica to receive an MRI as part of his routine checkup for his upcoming tour. Barker was to be sedated before the procedure, but technicians were unable to find a vein, sticking him at least 40x times in the process with a dirty needle and giving him staph. He’s suing the medical office.

Music Modernization Act Passes in Senate

Ed Christman, writing at Billboard:

The long road to copyright revision is nearing its end as the U.S. Senate passed the Music Modernization Act by unanimous consent Tuesday (Sept. 18). The move mimics the House’s unilateral support, previously passing the bill by a vote of 415-0 back in April.

With the Senate’s move, the legislation has been renamed the Orrin G. Hatch Music Modernization Act in honor of the Republican senior senator from Utah — a songwriter himself — who will retire at the end of his term this year.