Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift

Facial Recognition Used at Taylor Swift Concert to Track Stalkers

Steve Knopper, writing at Rolling Stone:

Taylor Swift fans mesmerized by rehearsal clips on a kiosk at her May 18th Rose Bowl show were unaware of one crucial detail: A facial-recognition camera inside the display was taking their photos. The images were being transferred to a Nashville “command post,” where they were cross-referenced with a database of hundreds of the pop star’s known stalkers, according to Mike Downing, chief security officer of Oak View Group, an advisory board for concert venues including Madison Square Garden and the Forum in L.A. “Everybody who went by would stop and stare at it, and the software would start working,” says Downing, who attended the concert to witness a demo of the system as a guest of the company that manufactures the kiosks.

A Year After Reputation

Taylor Swift

One year ago, Taylor Swift’s somewhat infamous LP Reputation hit the shelves and digital libraries of 700,000 listeners. It would go on to sell 1.26 million copies in that first week, making it a member of an elite club of albums to have broken a million copies (at all, let alone that first week) in the last decade… a club that is mostly comprised of Swift’s other records. It was an auspicious achievement in the pop star’s increasingly controversial career – every album she’s released since 2008’s Fearless has broken a million records sold in its first week.

Swift has become a polarizing figure in the pop culture sphere. Between the ongoing Kimye saga, 100% valid conversation and critiques about the downfalls of white feminism, her own personal #MeToo moment and the usual, misogyny-fueled obsession with her love life that’s been prominent since that first record broke a million all those years ago. (She has arguably used that obsession to her advantage in the years since, but… wouldn’t you?) The stage was certainly set for Reputation to be as polarizing as the woman herself – it was the first Swift record that broke her every-other-year-pattern ever, and followed a nearly year-long (and highly advisable) social media hiatus/blackout on Swift’s part. It’s safe to say, nobody knew what to expect; uncommonly for an artist whose unflinchingly loyal following was built on the closeness she shares with her fanbase, “nobody” included the vast majority of her fans.

Taylor Swift Tops the Charts (Again)

Taylor Swift once again has the number one album in the country:

Taylor Swift’s Reputation returns to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 albums chart for a fourth nonconsecutive week, as the set steps 2-1 in its seventh week on the list. Reputation earned 107,000 equivalent album units in the week ending Dec. 28, according to Nielsen Music (down 19 percent). Of that sum, 79,000 were in traditional album sales (down 24 percent).

Taylor Swift Outsold Every Other Album on the Billboard 200 Combined

Brittany Hodak, writing at Forbes:

Reputation sold north 1.2 million units in its first measured week. The other 199 albums on the Billboard 200 combined sold only 723,000 units when streaming consumption and song sales are excluded (only four tracks from Reputation are available on streaming services). That means for every 10 albums sold last week, more than six of them were Reputation.

When streaming and digital track sales are included, Reputation still accounts for more than a third of all music consumption in the United States last week.

Taylor Swift Becomes 2017’s Top Selling Album

Billboard:

Taylor Swift’s Reputation album sold 1.05 million copies in the US over its first four days of release, according to initial sales reports to Nielsen Music. It’s the first album to sell a million copies in a tracking week in nearly two years, since Adele’s 25 sold 1.16 million copies in the frame ending 12/25/2015 (the album’s fifth week on sale).

Taylor Swift’s ‘Reputation’ Sold 700,000 on First Day in U.S.

Billboard:

Taylor Swift’s Reputation is off to a red-hot start. The album sold around 700,000 copies in the U.S. on its first day of release, according to initial sales reports to Nielsen Music.

The set was released at 12 a.m. ET on Nov. 10, through Big Machine Records. Its first day sales figure could grow larger, after all of Nielsen’s retail reporters have submitted their sales for the day.

Hmm, that seems good.