Cremation Lily – “Wavering Blood” (Song Premiere)

Cremation Lily

Today I’m beyond stoked to help premiere Cremation Lily’s latest track “Wavering Blood,” pulled from Dreams Drenched in Static, the UK-based artist and multi-instrumentalist’s debut album for The Flenser. It’s one of my favorite songs from a stunning record – Zen Zsigo has created an atmosphere drenched in reverb and booming ambiance. The record drops on April 15th and is available to pre-order now.

Read More “Cremation Lily – “Wavering Blood” (Song Premiere)”

Warren Franklin – January (feat. Max Bemis) (Song Premiere)

Warren Franklin

Warren Franklin is back with their new song “January,” which features vocals from Max Bemis. The song is from the band’s upcoming EP, Second April, which will be available digitally and physically on April 1st (pre-order here). The band described the song as:

”January” was the song that sparked the whole record. We wrote the song with Max in mind and he brought so much life to it. It was inspired by songs like Dancing in The Dark, Kyoto by Phoebe Bridgers and Mitski’s Nobody. Songs that sound so infectious and fun on the surface, but carry a deep sadness in them once you dig beyond that. That’s January for me.

Check out the song below.

Read More “Warren Franklin – January (feat. Max Bemis) (Song Premiere)”

Drew Beringer’s Top Albums of 2021

Best of 2021

unfortunately 2021 felt a lot like 2020, huh? we’re fighting another wave of covid as I type this, our government is still putzing around, 40% of the country refuses to listen to science, etc. so that’s a major bummer but thankfully I’m vaxxed and boosted and if you are too, thank you. for me personally, the past 12 months were a whirlwind. my wife and I bought our first house this fall and a month ago we welcomed our first child into the hell world, a beautiful baby boy. so I can’t be anything but thankful for that. hopefully 2022 brings better things for all of us. anyways, below are the albums and EPs I liked the most – thanks for reading as always.

Read More “Drew Beringer’s Top Albums of 2021”

Interview: Keith Buckley of Every Time I Die

It’s been five long years but the new gods of Buffalo are set to return with their most complete and powerful album yet. RadicalEvery Time I Die’s ninth full-length – features 16 of the band’s most personal, vulnerable, and heaviest songs yet with a couple of new wrinkles and twists thrown in for good measure. Vocalist Keith Buckley has been to hell and back and has lived to tell it, as the veteran frontman took time out of his busy schedule to cut it up with me about sitting on the record during a pandemic, his newfound writing style, and Malignant.

Read More “Keith Buckley of Every Time I Die”

Parting – ‘Unmake Me’ (Album Premiere)

Parting

Parting is essentially a revivalist-emo super group consisting of Keith Latinen (Empire! Empire!), Ben Hendricks (Annabel), Gooey Fame (ex-Dowsing), and John Guynn (Hawk & Son). Latinen and Hendricks signature vocals pace the upbeat and melodic sound – their debut album Unmake Me is a must-listen for any fan of the genre. The collection drops this Friday but we got an exclusive first taste. Check it out below and pre-order it here.

Read More “Parting – ‘Unmake Me’ (Album Premiere)”

Interview: Missy Dabice of Mannequin Pussy

Mannequin Pussy

Like many artists this past year, 2020 was a challenging one for Mannequin Pussy. Just a few months removed from releasing Patience – their first record for Epitaph Records – the world was shut down by COVID-19. After discovering that creating new music in a socially distant type of way wasn’t working, the Philadelphia-based trio booked time at Will Yip’s Studio 4 to spark some creativity. What emerged was the Perfect EP – a five-track collection that showcases the best of Mannequin Pussy’s sound while also displaying a tenderness within. From the booming passion of “Control” and “To Lose You” to the abrasive thrash of the title track and “Pigs is Pigs,” Mannequin Pussy continues to evolve their style in incredibly special and diverse ways. Below, guitarist/vocalist Missy Dabice and I discuss being creative during a global pandemic, working with Yip, and “Drunk II” (of course).

Read More “Missy Dabice of Mannequin Pussy”

Interview: Adult Mom

Adult Mom

It’s been quite a long journey for Stevie Knipe to release their third album, Driver. After calling out royalty discrepancies and other issues with former label Tiny Engines and being granted the release from their contract, a pandemic shut down our world and further delayed the release of the album. But armed with a new perspective and a new label in Epitaph Records along with the support system of their partner (and drummer) Olivia Battell and guitarist Allegra Eidinger, Knipe is ready to unleash Driver to the masses – a record that elevates Adult Mom’s knack for infectious and poignant indie-rock to new levels. Here, Knipe and I discuss Driver’s sonic diversity, being a non-binary role model, and our favorite show Grey’s Anatomy.

Read More “Adult Mom”

Interview: Ben Walsh of Tigers Jaw

Tigers Jaw

Tigers Jaw’s new album I Won’t Care How You Remember Me serves as a re-introduction to the Scranton, PA band. For starters, guitarist Colin Gorman and drummer Teddy Roberts were made permanent members, solidifying the band as a quartet once again. But the biggest wrinkle was including Gorman and Roberts in the songwriting mix with original members Ben Walsh and Brianna Collins – fostering a more lively and collaborative setting for the record and resulting in Tigers Jaw’s most ambitious and personal album in their discography. Tracks like “Can’t Wait Forever” and “Lemon Mouth” showcase the new writing dynamic while the title track serves as an all-time highlight – a song that uses its slow build and Andy Hull guest vocals to set the tone of the record. “I think having a group dialogue about each song, and what ideas we had to make each one special and have a distinctive place on the record, was super beneficial to creating something that sounds fresh but still feels authentically like Tigers Jaw” says Walsh. Below, we discussed working with Will Yip, how the Andy Hull collaboration came about, and I Won’t Care How You Remember Me’s writing process.

Read More “Ben Walsh of Tigers Jaw”

Camp Trash – ‘Downtiming’ (Album Premiere)

Camp Trash

Much has been made about if Camp Trash is a real band or not. Sure, we’re heard rumors of such a band existing – hell we’ve even heard a few songs from the mysterious quartet. Today, however, will hopefully serve as evidence that “Camp Trash” is actually “a band” that plays a style of “emotional rock and roll” in the vein of scene staples like The Get Up Kids, Oso Oso, and the like because we are premiering their debut release Downtiming. The four-track extended play will hit streaming services this Friday, January 22nd, via Count Your Lucky Stars Records but you can exclusively stream it here this week (and then smash that pre-order). And just like Big Foot or the Loch Ness Monster, you’ll find your ears believing in the legend of Camp Trash.

Read More “Camp Trash – ‘Downtiming’ (Album Premiere)”

Respire – ‘Black Line’ Track-by-Track Break Down

Respire

I’ll always contend that the most exciting part of consuming music is discovering something new – an artist or band or record that just completely enraptures you – like you found the world’s greatest secret and can’t wait to share it with anyone and everyone. That’s Respire – the Toronto sextet that’s turning heavy music on its head. The band’s new record, Black Line, is 41 minutes of pummeling drums, jazzy time signatures, and swelling horns. It’s exhilarating blackened screamo with the ethos of Broken Social Scene – Respire burns down the boundaries of what extreme music can be. Below, the band walks us through their impactful new record track-by-track.

Read More “Respire – ‘Black Line’ Track-by-Track Break Down”

Review: The Front Bottoms – In Sickness & In Flames

The Front Bottoms - In Sickness & In Flames

It’s funny how life imitates art, huh? Initially inspired by the whirlwind year prior, The Front Bottoms’ latest work In Sickness & In Flames chronicles the ups and downs of Brian Sella and Mat Uychich’s lives – marriage, emergency surgeries, and property burning down (hence the In Flames part). But then 2020 went to shit and The Front Bottoms’ fifth album has undertaken a completely new meaning (lyrics like It’s like I’m wearin’ a mask/But you could still see my face are so unintentionally poignant and just kind of sufficiently sums up the ongoing tension of this year). Produced by Mike Sapone, In Sickness & In Flames is the duo’s most genuine and well-rounded release in their decade-plus long history, meshing prior influences with bolder ideas.

Read More “The Front Bottoms – In Sickness & In Flames”

Drew Beringer’s AbsolutePunk.net Reviews

AbsolutePunk.net

Hey remember AbsolutePunk.net? Once upon a time I used to write a lot of reviews. Hard to believe, I know. Jokes aside, Twitter and Jason’s “Re-Ranking The Decades” series dialed up the nostalgic side of me. I wanted to see if I still had some of the reviews I’d written over the past decade or so. Turns out, my iCloud Drive has a lot. Now I won’t be re-publishing every thing I’ve ever written (some of these documents deserve to stay buried in the depths of my hard drive), but I wanted to share the reviews that brought about a ton of lively discussion and debate on the records that defined that site and a lot of our musical interests. Cool? Cool. Now to see if I can bring back scene points….

Read More “Drew Beringer’s AbsolutePunk.net Reviews”

Interview: Brendan Kelly of The Lawrence Arms

The Lawrence Arms

You never expect your record about the impending apocalypse will actually release when the entire world is on fire but that’s where The Lawrence Arms find themselves. On July 17th, Chicago’s finest return with Skeleton Coast – the trio’s first collection of new material’s since 2014’s impressive Metropole. It’s been a long six years since then and the new record reflects that – as a creeping dread is felt throughout its fourteen tracks (as opener “Quiet Storm” bluntly puts it, “Listen closely: Some horsemen are calling. Lay back, the night sky is falling”). Skeleton Coast is a wild ride featuring the best work of the band’s career. I spoke with bassist/vocalist Brendan Kelly about recording Skeleton Coast in the middle of the Texas desert, being inspired by the Beastie Boys and Outkast, and how this record is the perfect record for this unprecedented times.

Read More “Brendan Kelly of The Lawrence Arms”

Review: Phoebe Bridgers – Punisher

Phoebe Bridgers - Punisher

When asked about the pressure of writing the follow-up to her successful debut Stranger in the Alps, Phoebe Bridgers responded with an emphatic fuck no. “I made the whole record knowing that people were going to hear it. And I made the first record being like, “I wonder if I’m going to have to get a day job after this,” Bridgers explained in a recent UPROXX interview. “Mostly I just wanted it to be better than the first record, which I think it is.” With that clearheaded mindset, Bridgers’s new record Punisher accomplishes that and more – her lyricism has never been sharper while each track features richer and deeper song textures than ever before.

With Punisher, Bridgers’s worldview continues to expand even as the world around her (and us) falls apart. Love, death, and the impending apocalypse are consistently swirling around us, and Bridgers is fiercely captivated by every detail and how they exist within everyday banalities. Her interpretations and retelling of each one is wittier and sharper than ever. “Garden Song” begins with Bridgers daydreaming of living in her friend’s “house up on the hill,” but only after implying that the white supremacist neighbor has been murdered and buried in her new garden. There’s a contentment behind the wistful opener as she reveals that “the doctor put her hands over my liver/she told me my resentment’s getting smaller,” melancholically sighing, “No, I’m not afraid of hard work/I get everything I want/I have everything I wanted.”

Read More “Phoebe Bridgers – Punisher”