Beer

Beer

MxPx to Release 25th Anniversary Beer

MxPx and Silver City Brewery have teamed up to release a special beer to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the band. It’ll be available in May and you can sign up for an email to be notified when you can purchase it.

Named after the band’s 2007 hit, “Secret Weapon”, the brew is a delicious amber lager brewed in the “left-coast common” style. Super easy-going with a full-flavored malt backbone and a clean hop kick on the finish, the recipe is a true collaborative effort between the Silver City brew team and band members Mike, Tom, and Yuri, who were heavily involved in its development, adding their own personal tastes and flavor preferences.

Pitchfork Launches Beer-Focused Website

Pitchfork have launched a new digital publication focused on beer. It’s called October:

A destination for devotees and novices alike to read about, learn about, and share their appreciation for beer and celebrate the culture around it. The site is being launched in partnership with ZX Ventures, AB InBev’s incubator and venture capital fund that focuses on increasing awareness and excitement around beer and brewing culture.

The web design is infuriating, but the writing seems to be of Pitchfork’s well-known style:

October aims to capture the spirit, ambition, and wort-soaked labor of the gambrinus pursuit — the making and drinking of the good life. Through essays, travels, events, and an objective look at what makes beer so damn good, our hope is that you’ll find resonance here, something of unusual quaffability, as part of the drinking class.

Descendents Collaborate on Signature Beer

The Descendents have teamed up with Mikkeller Brewery to create “Feel This,” a coffee IPA named after a song from their latest album Hypercaffium Spazzinate.

“Having grown up in the punk rock and skate punk scene, it was an honor to be given the opportunity to create a beer for the Descendents to celebrate their recently released album,” said Bill Batten, Mikkeller SD Brew Master). “While doing this collaboration we got an opportunity to meet the Dark Matter boys and learn about their coffee process. Using their roasting profiles, in combination with our passion for hop-forward IPA’s, we were able to create a special beer as unique as the band.”

New Order to Release Beer

New Order will be releasing a beer called “Stray Dogs.”

The premium 4.2% beer, named ‘Stray Dog’ (after a track on the band’s most recent album Music Complete), is a refreshing and clean tasting golden ale with hints of citrus fruit and lychee, all balanced by a subtle bitterness.

Bayside to Release Black IPA With Oskar Blues

Bayside have teamed up with Oskar Blues Brewery to collaborate on a “Black IPA.” Anyone want to send me some to review?

The beer, which features a malty backbone with bright, citrusy hops, will be limited to 100 barrels and available for a pre-order bundle with the new album via Craftshack (availability restricted to participating states). The cans will also be available at Total Wine & More, as well as select venues with a special focus on stores/venues along Bayside’s tour (dates below).

Budweiser Renaming Beer “America”

Budweiser are renaming their “beer” America for the summer.

The campaign is Budweiser’s plea for attention — and it’s working. (You’re reading this article, after all.) But the fact that it’s needed at all shows how much American beer-drinking habits have altered in the past few decades. Tastes have changed several times, and each change has pushed Budweiser further down on America’s list.

This feels straight out of a Futurama plot.

The Rise and Fall of America’s Awful Beer Glass

Laura Bliss, writing for CityLab, on the history of what is widely known as draft beer’s most common drinking glass … and why it sucks:

Under Fitz’s watch, there’s not a shaker glass in sight. The glass he once hardly noticed in the race towards sloshdom he now detests. “Shaker pints were never meant for draft,” Fitz says. “They’re the worst thing that ever happened to beer.”

And it’s not just at Pizza Paradiso. In more and more bars across the country, the little-recognized shaker is slipping out the back door. And among beer’s devotees, the end of the glass that defined a century in beer can’t come soon enough.