Stop using your [design work] like a time card. If you did it right, it looks like it was effortless. It looks like it’s always existed. And the client will probably be irritated that they paid you for 30 hours of work to do something that looks like it took an hour. Which it did. They’re just not seeing the 29 hours of bad design that got you to that one hour of good design. And for the love of god, please don’t show them those 29 hours of bad design. A presentation is a shitty place for a sausage-making demonstration and you’ll just come across as a defensive, unsure person needing validation. Sell the fuck out of that one hour of good design — most people can’t do ten minutes of it.

The artist is a human being, not a product. Sure, the artist makes products that are for sale, but the artist is not forever in your debt because you may have purchased a product from them at some point.

When you buy an album from me, I receive money and you get music. It’s a fair and even exchange that begins and ends once I receive my money and you receive your product. If I don’t value myself as an artist — especially working in a market that has decided that recorded music is not worth spending money on — then who will?

A must read.


The ones who leave you when you’re wounded
Will be the first in line to say they always knew that you could do it
I got love for the place I live, love for the places I’ve been
I bring the wrath in the right directions

I wanted to write a site for someone it’s meant for. That reader I write for is a second version of me. I’m writing for him. He’s interested in the exact same things I’m interested in; he reads the exact same websites I read. I want him to like this website so much that he reads it from the top to the bottom, and he reads everything. Every single word. The copyright statement, what software I use, he’s read it all.

If I turn comments on, that goes away. It’s not that I don’t like sites with comments on, but when you read a site with comments it automatically puts you, the reader, in a defensive mode where you’re saying, “what’s good in this comment thread? What can I skim?”

It’s totally egotistical. I want Daring Fireball to be a site that you can’t skim if you’re in the target audience for it. You say, “Oh, a new article from John. I need to read it,” and your deadlines go whizzing by because you have to read what I wrote.

If I turn comments on I feel like it’s two different directions. You get to the end of my article and you’re like, “let’s see if there’s anything interesting. Let’s see if there’s any names I know.” That’s really it. Sometimes a design decision is what you don’t put in, as opposed to what you put in.

Hmm.

Bookmarked.

NBC is developing Real Genius, a single-camera comedy based on the 1985 movie starring Val Kilmer. The project, which has received a script commitment plus penalty, hails from Sony TV, whose sibling label TriStar Pictures produced the movie; Adam Sandler’s Sony-based company Happy Madison; and 3 Arts Entertainment.

I grew up thinking I was the only person who loved this movie. I have it on VHS somewhere. I’m going to pretend Adam Sandler’s company isn’t involved in this and pray the show turns out decent.

Episode 52: It’s Really F*cking Good


  This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast has us revisiting a few of the topics from last week as the entire “U2 on your phone” thing became a much larger story than we anticipated. We then look at the idea of having a “collection” of music and how or why that plays a role with digital files, streaming, and the rise of vinyl. Then we discuss the pretty awesome new Manchester Orchestra album and release method, and then talk a little bit more about Yellowcard’s new one as well. We finish up with a discussion about Senses Fail signing with Pure Noise Records and thinking aloud about why bands still sign with records labels. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.


iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

Episode 52: It’s Really F*cking Good

This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast has us revisiting a few of the topics from last week as the entire “U2 on your phone” thing became a much larger story than we anticipated. We then look at the idea of having a “collection” of music and how or why that plays a role with digital files, streaming, and the rise of vinyl. Then we discuss the pretty awesome new Manchester Orchestra album and release method, and then talk a little bit more about Yellowcard’s new one as well. We finish up with a discussion about Senses Fail signing with Pure Noise Records and thinking aloud about why bands still sign with records labels. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.

iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

The pilot itself is among the best you’ll see this fall. It looks great, the two leads have instant chemistry, and everything hums along nicely as a slightly larger-than-life crime saga. (John Doman from “The Wire” is terrific as local kingpin Carmine Falcone.) And the show does very well a recreating the one famous Batman sequence it’s allowed to use, with the murder of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne and its immediate aftermath. (Mazouz, who had a largely silent role as Kiefer Sutherland’s son on “Touch,” has a very loud and powerful reaction to the crime.) What’s in the first hour is more than enough to keep me watching for a while (and writing about the show each week, at least in the early going).

I’m down to watch Ryan Atwood in Gotham City. Season 3 of Arrow (which has had two great seasons), season 1 of Flash (which had a really solid pilot), and now season 1 of Gotham. Hmm, this is the most TV I’ve probably wanted to watch in years.

The “Portland as retirement community for the young” stereotype was around before Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen lampooned it on cable. But this well-worn claim has been repeatedly debunked. As Portland State University researchers Greg Schrock and Jason Jurjevich have shown, far from retiring, young and talented people coming to Portland are decidedly entrepreneurial. On average, they’re 50 percent more likely to start their own businesses. And Portland ranks third nationally among large metro areas in the fraction of its college-educated young adults running their own businesses.

That NYT article that was floating around this week on all the social networks pissed me off. Complete misrepresentation of this city and everyone working their asses off here. Glad to see a response with the facts.

Just like we have in the past few years, we like to find those little gems that come with every brand new version of iOS. So in this post, you’ll find dozens and dozens of tips, tricks, and details of iOS 8 that we’ve collected throughout the summer since the first beta release of iOS 8.

The person-as-concept idea is a powerful one. People ascribe all sorts of crazy stuff to you without knowing anything about the context of your actual life. I even lost real-life friends because my online actions as a person were viewed through a conceptual lens; basically: “you shouldn’t have acted in that way because of what it means for the community” or some crap like that. Eventually (and mostly unconsciously), I distanced myself from my conceptual counterpart and became much less of a presence online. I mean, I still post stuff here, on Twitter, on Instagram, and so on, but very little of it is actually personal and almost none of it is opinionated in any noteworthy way. Unlike Persson or Fish, I didn’t quit. I just got boring. Which I guess isn’t so good for business, but neither is quitting.

Highly recommend this video.

Apple Watch is not a product from a tech company, and it will not be understood, at all, by the tech world. Apple creates and uses technology in incredible ways. The Apple Watch may prove to be the most technologically advanced product they’ve ever built. But Apple is not a tech company, and Apple watch is not a tech product.

There is no one writing about technology the way Gruber does. Great piece and insight.