Episode 52: It’s Really F*cking Good


  This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast has us revisiting a few of the topics from last week as the entire “U2 on your phone” thing became a much larger story than we anticipated. We then look at the idea of having a “collection” of music and how or why that plays a role with digital files, streaming, and the rise of vinyl. Then we discuss the pretty awesome new Manchester Orchestra album and release method, and then talk a little bit more about Yellowcard’s new one as well. We finish up with a discussion about Senses Fail signing with Pure Noise Records and thinking aloud about why bands still sign with records labels. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.


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Episode 52: It’s Really F*cking Good

This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast has us revisiting a few of the topics from last week as the entire “U2 on your phone” thing became a much larger story than we anticipated. We then look at the idea of having a “collection” of music and how or why that plays a role with digital files, streaming, and the rise of vinyl. Then we discuss the pretty awesome new Manchester Orchestra album and release method, and then talk a little bit more about Yellowcard’s new one as well. We finish up with a discussion about Senses Fail signing with Pure Noise Records and thinking aloud about why bands still sign with records labels. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.

iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

The pilot itself is among the best you’ll see this fall. It looks great, the two leads have instant chemistry, and everything hums along nicely as a slightly larger-than-life crime saga. (John Doman from “The Wire” is terrific as local kingpin Carmine Falcone.) And the show does very well a recreating the one famous Batman sequence it’s allowed to use, with the murder of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne and its immediate aftermath. (Mazouz, who had a largely silent role as Kiefer Sutherland’s son on “Touch,” has a very loud and powerful reaction to the crime.) What’s in the first hour is more than enough to keep me watching for a while (and writing about the show each week, at least in the early going).

I’m down to watch Ryan Atwood in Gotham City. Season 3 of Arrow (which has had two great seasons), season 1 of Flash (which had a really solid pilot), and now season 1 of Gotham. Hmm, this is the most TV I’ve probably wanted to watch in years.

The “Portland as retirement community for the young” stereotype was around before Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen lampooned it on cable. But this well-worn claim has been repeatedly debunked. As Portland State University researchers Greg Schrock and Jason Jurjevich have shown, far from retiring, young and talented people coming to Portland are decidedly entrepreneurial. On average, they’re 50 percent more likely to start their own businesses. And Portland ranks third nationally among large metro areas in the fraction of its college-educated young adults running their own businesses.

That NYT article that was floating around this week on all the social networks pissed me off. Complete misrepresentation of this city and everyone working their asses off here. Glad to see a response with the facts.

Just like we have in the past few years, we like to find those little gems that come with every brand new version of iOS. So in this post, you’ll find dozens and dozens of tips, tricks, and details of iOS 8 that we’ve collected throughout the summer since the first beta release of iOS 8.

The person-as-concept idea is a powerful one. People ascribe all sorts of crazy stuff to you without knowing anything about the context of your actual life. I even lost real-life friends because my online actions as a person were viewed through a conceptual lens; basically: “you shouldn’t have acted in that way because of what it means for the community” or some crap like that. Eventually (and mostly unconsciously), I distanced myself from my conceptual counterpart and became much less of a presence online. I mean, I still post stuff here, on Twitter, on Instagram, and so on, but very little of it is actually personal and almost none of it is opinionated in any noteworthy way. Unlike Persson or Fish, I didn’t quit. I just got boring. Which I guess isn’t so good for business, but neither is quitting.

Highly recommend this video.

Apple Watch is not a product from a tech company, and it will not be understood, at all, by the tech world. Apple creates and uses technology in incredible ways. The Apple Watch may prove to be the most technologically advanced product they’ve ever built. But Apple is not a tech company, and Apple watch is not a tech product.

There is no one writing about technology the way Gruber does. Great piece and insight.

The only thing he leaves out is his own incredible talk. XOXO was one of the best conference experiences I’ve ever had — bar none — and I’ve come away more inspired and excited about the future than I’ve been in a long time. I’ll probably have more thoughts later, and I’ll definitely link up the full talks/videos when they go online.

News Article Update

I’m not sure the first time I came up with the idea of associating each news post on the website with a specific mini-icon — but I think it was somewhere around 2002. I liked the idea of there being a quick way to associate a news story with what it was about at first glance and while skimming. To this day I like that it’s done in a small and minimal way (the amount of news you can see on your screen and consume remains a high priority on AP.net). Over the past few days I updated a whole bunch of these icons and mini-images for the news on our site. This was the final part of the redesign of our news articles and as I began working on the large task of fixing images I realized something: there’s a good chance this is the last time I ever update these images. A while back I thought I’d update them maybe yearly, but that obviously never happened. When there were only 50 or so you could update them for each album cycle for the bands, but as that exploded that became pretty impossible. This time around, I decided that I would make them as recognizable as possible and default to an image or icon that most people could easily associate with the topic. (E.g. Using Deja Entendu as the Brand New icon instead of the little Daisy wolf.) I also re-configured the news article code to work better with our vast artist database so that the main image used while viewing an article was pulled from the database itself. This way staff can swap out images for bands much easier and keep the main larger images up to date as needed.

Starting at about the 1:12 mark in this week’s episode of ATP, John Siracusa does some of the best 20 or so minutes of articulating how men can become more informed about the treatment of women in our society I’ve heard. A lot of this is informed by the recent bullshit in the gaming community, but I would argue it’s absolutely applicable to every walk of life. He nails why it’s important and I especially liked his points about how difficult learning about this will be — you’ll have to face some very uncomfortable truths about your own behavior — and how immersing yourself in it and just reading, not talking about, just reading, is key. Furthermore, the points brought up about why it’s important to say something and not just sit back while harassment is going on is something I think everyone should listen to.

Could not recommend it more — one of the best episodes of any podcast I’ve ever listened to.


"The Crossing" is a 15-20 minute documentary that follows activist, writer, and sponsored trail runner Nick Triolo as he organizes and attempts a 70-mile protest run in resistance to open-pit gold mining in Southern Baja, Mexico.

The protest was a grassroots campaign to unify and mobilize an entire peninsula to defend the Sierra, an important symbol of undeveloped, wild beauty in the region. In three months, Nick collaborated with environmental groups, artists and government officials to implement a protest that included multiple rallies, town meetings, and finally … a protest run.

I am lucky enough to call Nick a friend.

Episode 50: Sweaters Unfold Themselves


  This week we look at the tech issues AP.net has faced (and my potential liver failure as a result), the possibility of Fall Out Boy releasing a new single and if it’s even possible for big bands to keep secrets, and then we dive into the main event: fall albums. We talk about what makes an album specifically a fall album, what we look for in our favorites, and then we start talking about a whole bunch of different bands and albums that we love as the leaves start to change. We may still be a few weeks away until we can really break out all these albums — but now’s a great time to start building those playlists. I tried to go through and write down all the bands mentioned in the podcast and include them in the show notes, but I know I missed some. And last, but not least, thank you to you, the listeners, for spending an hour or so listening to us each week. Here’s to 50 more. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.


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My Recommendations From This Episode:

Wolftron
Flux
Goodfellas
Stay very far away from ‘Draft Day’
Counting Crows
Sir Sly

Episode 50: Sweaters Unfold Themselves

This week we look at the tech issues AP.net has faced (and my potential liver failure as a result), the possibility of Fall Out Boy releasing a new single and if it’s even possible for big bands to keep secrets, and then we dive into the main event: fall albums. We talk about what makes an album specifically a fall album, what we look for in our favorites, and then we start talking about a whole bunch of different bands and albums that we love as the leaves start to change. We may still be a few weeks away until we can really break out all these albums — but now’s a great time to start building those playlists. I tried to go through and write down all the bands mentioned in the podcast and include them in the show notes, but I know I missed some. And last, but not least, thank you to you, the listeners, for spending an hour or so listening to us each week. Here’s to 50 more. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.

iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

My Recommendations From This Episode:

Place avocados in a bowl. Squeeze lime juice on top and roughly smash with a fork until thoroughly mashed. Add jalapeno pepper, garlic, onion, tomato, cilantro, salt, and pepper; gently combine with a fork.

Don’t waste time with mixes full of powdery garbage — bookmark this one.

Vox looks at authorial intent:

But you might have noticed a lot of TV critics yesterday saying they didn’t much care about what Chase said (both in the wake of the piece and after he released the later statement), that they remained comfortable with the idea of the final scene being totally ambiguous. And this is because many, many critics reject the idea of authorial intent completely.

Remember when I got absolutely shit on for saying authorial intent was kind of irrelevant in the criticism of music? Yeah me too.

So for many critics — including myself — the most important thing about a work is not what the author intends but what the reader gleans from it. Authorial intent is certainly interesting, but it’s not going to get me to stop calling Hello Kitty a cat.

Yep.

New Criticism largely won out, and for the most part, authorial intent is treated as a curiosity in critical circles today. (There are still people who care about authorial intent, of course, but they do not tend to be the most prominent voices, particularly in popular criticism.)

There are people that called me pretty fucked up names about 5 years ago that I hope see this article.