Jessical Valenti, writing for The Atlantic:

There is an obsessive tendency in American culture with elevating women—young, beautiful women, especially—to celebrity status just to bask in their eventual fall. There’s also a tendency in American culture, meanwhile, to shame women for their sexuality. So I would not be surprised in the days ahead to see arguments as to why this is somehow the fault of the celebrities whose phones were hacked—that these women took the pictures, that they were posing, that generating publicity is part of their job.

But victim-blaming is just that, no matter how famous the victim is.

Luke O’Neil, writing for Esquire:

When you consider this is a generation who have divorced all sense of worth from intellectual property – music, movies and so on – it’s easy to see why they might think of digital dissemination of a stolen image as a victimless crime. It’s on the Internet, therefore it’s mine for the taking. But unlike music, for example, in which the creator wanted people to have access to it in the first place, stolen photos like these were never meant to be seen.

And:

It all comes back to the question of access. Men, particularly younger men raised on a steady diet of sexting and amateur porn, feel entitled to the bodies of women. This is nothing new of course. We just have so many faster and more readily available means of sating this hunger now.

But in this hunt we’ve lost track of what the sexiest thing about a woman is in the first place: her permission, her desire, her saying, to us, “yes.”

That’s the exact opposite of what we’re after when it comes to hacked photos. We thrill at violating her lack of permission, because the forbidden knowledge, the glimpse into her soul (through the lens of her breasts), is a rarer commodity.

Yeah, I know this is a little bit of a weird recommendation — but it’s also the best cat litter I’ve ever used. Mo seems to love it and the formula works so well I no longer walk around the apartment and step on little sandy granules. That would be reason enough to use it, but it also covers odors better than literally every other cat litter I’ve tried (and we’ve tried a bunch).

Also, let’s pause for a moment to realize I’m now that person that buys cat litter online. Adult achievement unlocked?

Clementine Ford, writing for DailyLife:

1) This is not a ‘scandal’

It’s a crime, and we should be discussing it as such. Some media outlets are salaciously reporting it otherwise, as if the illegal violation of privacy involving intimate images is little more than subject for gossip. When associated with sex, the word ‘scandal’ has been typically interpreted as something that assigns responsibility to all parties involved, a consensual act unfortunately discovered and for which everyone owes an explanation or apology. […]

2) These women do not ‘only have themselves to blame’

While depressing, it’s sadly unsurprising to see some people arguing that Lawrence et al brought this on themselves. Part of living in a rape culture is the ongoing expectation that women are responsible for protecting themselves from abuse, and that means avoiding behaviour which might be later ‘exploited’ by the people who are conveniently never held to account for their actions. But women are entitled to consensually engage in their sexuality any way they see fit. If that involves taking nude self portraits for the enjoyment of themselves or consciously selected others, that’s their prerogative.

Ever notice how people texting at night have that eerie blue glow?

Or wake up ready to write down the Next Great Idea, and get blinded by your computer screen?

During the day, computer screens look good—they’re designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn’t be looking at the sun.

f.lux fixes this: it makes the color of your computer’s display adapt to the time of day, warm at night and like sunlight during the day.

Started using this a week or so ago.


I’ve recommended this band, Sir Sly, a few times now. Here we have their new song from the new album of the same name, You Haunt Me. After spinning their brand new album pretty much non-stop this week, I’ve gotta say this isn’t even in the top half. Fully loving this thing. Going to have to take a break over the weekend and try and finally finish my Yellowcard impressions post though.

Didn’t have enough extra time this week to post much on this blog — used most of my free time to put some lipstick on the pig and clean up our album review section, review pages, and more. Trying to do what we can with what we have. Please let me know if you find any bugs.

Episode 49: Transitioning From Transit


  Due to some technical issues, Drew wasn’t able to join us for our recording, so you’ll have to deal with just Thomas and me. This week we look at a variety of topics: Follow-up from last week and looking at a few questions and comments we saw. Things like do we love music based on merit or past love for an artist? Does all music from our formative years hold up or does it get more of a critical “pass” as we get older? Then we talk a little about Thomas’ prediction in last week’s episode that Tim had left Transit — only to see it come true just hours after releasing the podcast. From there we dive into one of our favorite topics: growth of a band’s career and longevity. Why do similar bands see different outcomes from similar situations? How did All Time Low survive Dirty Work when Boys Like Girls never really recovered? Does social media savvy give some bands the upper hand in this regard? We finish the conversation with a discussion about live shows and what we are looking for from a live performance these days. Yes, Blink-182 ‘suck’ live and don’t sound like their albums — is that really a bad thing though?


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My Recommendations From This Episode:

Counting Crows
Sir Sly

Episode 49: Transitioning From Transit

Due to some technical issues, Drew wasn’t able to join us for our recording, so you’ll have to deal with just Thomas and me. This week we look at a variety of topics: Follow-up from last week and looking at a few questions and comments we saw. Things like do we love music based on merit or past love for an artist? Does all music from our formative years hold up or does it get more of a critical “pass” as we get older? Then we talk a little about Thomas’ prediction in last week’s episode that Tim had left Transit — only to see it come true just hours after releasing the podcast. From there we dive into one of our favorite topics: growth of a band’s career and longevity. Why do similar bands see different outcomes from similar situations? How did All Time Low survive Dirty Work when Boys Like Girls never really recovered? Does social media savvy give some bands the upper hand in this regard? We finish the conversation with a discussion about live shows and what we are looking for from a live performance these days. Yes, Blink-182 ‘suck’ live and don’t sound like their albums — is that really a bad thing though?

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My Recommendations From This Episode:

Matt Gemmell, writing on his site:

Let me turn the “why don’t you stick to talking about (topic)?” question around: what gives you the right to decide what I want to talk about?

Here’s my position: I’m not publishing a newspaper that you’ve purchased. You walked into my house. I’m OK with you hanging around, but 100% of the rules are made by me, and 100% compliance is absolutely mandatory. You get zero say in my content. There is no Letters Page for your complaint. You can’t ask to talk to my superior, because I’m at the top of the tree – and I’m going to agree with me.

There are circumstances where you get to complain about something that someone has written, to the extent of asking them to not write about that topic again. I can’t think of one right now, but I’m sure such scenarios exist. A free, personal, opt-in, opt-out-at-any-time social media stream is not in that category. It staggers me that anyone would have the audacity to even try, yet it happens. It’s abusive.

Amir Goldberg, writing for Stanford:

We like believing that our decision to download a song to our smartphone is the result of conscious, perhaps even rational, individual choice. But above all, we are social animals. Every decision, even the most banal, is deeply rooted in our cultural identity. Musical taste is never merely about melody or lyrics. Studies find a consistent relationship between, on the one hand, ethnicity, education, and income, and, on the other, musical and other preferences. Our decisions tend to be similar to those who are like us socio-demographically. Struggles over the qualitative value of our preferences are therefore also struggles between different sociocultural identities over their position in the social hierarchy. Distinctions between sophisticated music and pop are also value-based distinctions between the different audiences that consume them.

We’re trying out something a little new and moving our tracking and booking of podcast sponsorships over to Syndicate Ads. If you have a product or service you’d like to promote to our dedicated, discerning, and awesome podcast audience — let’s talk! Real talk: I think podcast ads are one of the best and most underused ways to reach people right now, definitely worth looking into even if you’re not working with us specifically.

Jack Moore, writing on Medium:

This, of course, is the big reason why Davis’s story is so inspirational. It’s one thing for a 13-year-old girl to waltz into Williamsport and throw 70 MPH fastballs right by the best baseball playing boys in the country — tossing in some clutch hitting and utility woman versatility for good measure — but she’s doing so while navigating a morass of institutionalized sexism from coaches, parents, fellow players, and fans parroting what they’ve heard from their older role models. She’s doing this in a world where, as Emma Span wrote for the New York Times, most girls who show baseball talent are heavily pressured to move to softball. And she’s doing despite the fact that many males don’t view her as a legitimate athlete at all.

Funny enough, I wasn’t even angry at first. I was actually kind of amused. Who doesn’t laugh at unfortunate shots of poorly dressed strangers? I’ve certainly done it before; the Internet runs on this kind of anonymous scorn. There are entire websites dedicated to the poor fashion choices of random people. And just like me, most of those people are fat.

I don’t generally view my body size as positive or negative — it simply is. I eat right (most of the time) and I exercise (an inordinate amount), but it does little, thanks to a struggle with polycystic ovarian syndrome and a failing thyroid gland. I’m strong, I’m flexible and my doctor assures me my health is good, but the fact remains: I’m larger than someone my height should be. […]

So I laughed it all off at first — but then, I read the comments.

Episode 48: Do The Genre Hop


  This week we’re back with a jam-packed episode that covers a variety of topics: We look at what it’s like working in this industry and offer advice for those wanting to get into it, we discuss if album cycles lead to albums being overhyped and if bands basically get two albums before collapsing under the expectations. We also touch on musicians that genre-hop in order to prolong their careers, and we ask the question everyone seems to be wondering: Uh, what the fuck is going on with Transit? Is Tim still in the band? What’s going on over in that camp? Plus there’s a nice rant or two all about Pitchfork’s “Albums of the Decade” list. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.


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My Recommendations From This Episode:

Macbeth Shoes
Saves the Day
A blog post I wrote.

Episode 48: Do The Genre Hop

This week we’re back with a jam-packed episode that covers a variety of topics: We look at what it’s like working in this industry and offer advice for those wanting to get into it, we discuss if album cycles lead to albums being overhyped and if bands basically get two albums before collapsing under the expectations. We also touch on musicians that genre-hop in order to prolong their careers, and we ask the question everyone seems to be wondering: Uh, what the fuck is going on with Transit? Is Tim still in the band? What’s going on over in that camp? Plus there’s a nice rant or two all about Pitchfork’s “Albums of the Decade” list. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.

iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

My Recommendations From This Episode: