You embrace the uncertainty and discomfort. Lots of people avoid these two things, but without them, you never get good at anything. You never learn anything worthwhile. Embrace these things and grow.

You do it not for success or some end goal, but for the sake of learning.

You do it because you’re tired of being in the pain of disappointment and regret. You want to get out of this dark hole, because staying in it sucks.

You start moving because you don’t want to let your life be ruled by fear. You don’t want to give up every time you face resistance.

I had a few people ask me about the icons found in the screenshot I posted yesterday. I found a bunch of them on MacRumors, by the user Arn0, and turned them into a template so I could make more. I uploaded a few of the more common ones here, with a few of my additions and tweaks. I’m loving the consistency of my current dock. AP.net user RyanPM pointed me to the free app LiteIcon for quickly and easily changing icons (I’ve found it makes it easier for apps that revert after an update).

I also tossed into that thread a new version of my Alfred theme to better match Yosemite. The new default Alfred themes are actually pretty similar to what I had created a while back, but I had a few readability tweaks I wanted to make.

And for fun: There’s also a workflow I modified to quickly respond to your last iMessage and one for uploading a selected image on your computer to imgur.com for sharing (an action I do daily).

I also plugged the app Hazel for doing a bunch of cool folder tricks. Currently I’m using it to automatically categorize every photo I take into dated folders on Dropbox as well as run some rules on my Downloads folder to keep it nice and organized. Definitely worth a look for power users. And, while hovering around the Apple topic, I think I’m going to pull the trigger on the new Retina iMac upgrade.

All of the things I’ve been reading, and the praise from many I trust, leads me to think it’s time. I’m going to spend the rest of the weekend thinking through the decision and what workflow changes it would need — and then make the final call Sunday night. Or throw back a few beers and be reckless while budgeting out and buying Christmas gifts for friends and family … we’ll see what wins out.

Most writers sow adjectives almost unconsciously into the soil of their prose to make it more lush and pretty, and the sentences become longer and longer as they fill up with the stately elms and frisky kittens and hard bitten detectives and sleepy lagoons. This is adjective-by-habit — a habit you should get rid of. Not every Oak has to be gnarled. The adjective that exist solely as decoration is a self-indulgence for the writer and the burden for the reader.

I am currently re-reading On Writing Well by William Zinsser. Inarguably my favorite book on writing I’ve ever read.

We want to help you out too, so we’re throwing a 30-percent-off launch sale! That means you can get secure and save a ton of time online for just $35!

I love this app and it’s on sale for the Yosemite launch — if you’ve been waiting to pick it up, now’s a good time.

Episode 55: Where’s My Lyric Sheet?


  This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast looks at the music industry and the business it’s become. We start by looking at record sales and how in 2014 we don’t really have an accurate way of counting them. This then leads to a question posed to us on Facebook about when bands break up and there’s this huge wave of support, where were all those fans during the band’s career? We also look at some of the behind-the-scenes aspects to Thomas’s New Found Glory review and all of the comments he’s seen on this site and elsewhere. Was his review disrespectful to the band? Why did the new album get a 4 when the last album got an 8? How does a reviewer’s opinion change and what responsibility do they have in explaining this to their audience? We end talking about Punk Goes Pop 6. I am unimpressed. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.


iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

Episode 55: Where’s My Lyric Sheet?

This week’s episode of the AbsolutePunk Podcast looks at the music industry and the business it’s become. We start by looking at record sales and how in 2014 we don’t really have an accurate way of counting them. This then leads to a question posed to us on Facebook about when bands break up and there’s this huge wave of support, where were all those fans during the band’s career? We also look at some of the behind-the-scenes aspects to Thomas’s New Found Glory review and all of the comments he’s seen on this site and elsewhere. Was his review disrespectful to the band? Why did the new album get a 4 when the last album got an 8? How does a reviewer’s opinion change and what responsibility do they have in explaining this to their audience? We end talking about Punk Goes Pop 6. I am unimpressed. The episode can be streamed and/or downloaded below.

iTunes - Soundcloud - Stitcher - RSS - Archive

The 5K Retina iMac is out, and it looks incredible so far on paper — so incredible that I’m seriously considering selling my new Mac Pro to get the Retina iMac instead. In fact, the case for the Mac Pro for anyone but advanced video editors, 3D modelers, and heavy OpenCL users is now weaker than ever.

I currently have a mid-2010 Mac Pro (the giant cheese grater one) and I had been thinking about upgrading for a while. I haven’t decided yet, but man this new Retina iMac is an incredible machine. It’s very tempting.

We’re excited to announce the arrival of Coda 2.5, a very significant update to our very popular web development app for OS X, available now — and free of charge for all Coda 2 owners.

Coda is the app I would say is the reason I first started using OSX.

Oscar-winner Christian Bale, who has played Batman and Moses, is about to take on another iconic figure: Steve Jobs. Sources confirm the actor is in talks to star in “Jobs,” Sony’s biopic about the late Apple co-founder. Based on Walter Isaacson’s biography “Steve Jobs,” the real-life drama is directed by Danny Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin.

Damn. That would be some very good casting.

Today we’re happy to announce we’ve converted our entire catalog of over 30 million songs to high-quality AAC audio. Listeners around the world now have four sound quality settings to choose from across iOS, Android, and the web. All Rdio users can choose between data-efficient 64 kbps all the way up to 192 kbps. Rdio Unlimited subscribers now also have the option of listening in pristine-quality 320 kbps. Plus individually select your audio settings for a variety of uses, whether you’re using Wi-Fi or cellular streaming or listening to offline downloads.

I’m going 96 on cellular streaming on my phone (because I’m not an animal), 320 on wi-fi and on the desktop app.

When the book is finally closed on the product line known as OS X, last year’s release of OS X 10.9 Mavericks may end up getting short shrift. Sure, it brought tangible energy saving benefits to Mac laptop owners, but such gains are quickly taken for granted; internal changes and new frameworks are not as memorable to customers as they may be to developers and technophiles. And while Mavericks included many new user-visible features, and even new bundled applications, the cumulative effect was that of a pleasant upgrade, not a blockbuster.

OS X 10.10 comes out today. This is the review to read about it. (I’ll be waiting until I get all my work done to upgrade.)

For the last 12 years, John Gruber’s tracked the modern era of Apple on Daring Fireball, his personal web site turned full-time job. Bootstrapped with reader contributions and shirt sales, John’s thoughtful approach to sponsorship allowed him to remain fiercely independent, while working on projects like Markdown, The Talk Show, and Vesper, his minimalist note-taking app.

I walked away from this talk being so inspired that I just had to go make something. I’ve been working very hard on it ever sense. (Sidebar: I got to talk a little with John afterward and I feel like I stumbled over myself like a fool. Embarrassing.)

Over the weekend, a game developer in Boston named Brianna Wu fled her home after an online stalker vowed to rape and kill her. She isn’t the first woman who’s been forced into hiding by aggrieved video game fans associated with Gamergate, the self-styled reform movement that’s become difficult to ignore over the past several months as its beliefs have ramified out from the fever swamps of the internet into the real world. She probably won’t be the last.

This needs to stop. This is wrong and beyond disgusting.

Others say that some men in the tech industry are all too aware of social dynamics, they just don’t understand that their position in the tech ecosystem is a privileged and powerful one. “Many of them were bullied as kids for being geeks and believe that makes them incapable of bullying or oppressive behavior,” writes software developer Ashe Dryden. A self-image as a long-suffering nerd can prevent men from seeing that they’re actually part of the dominant group: we’re talking about Silicon Valley, where technical skills and social awkwardness are badges of honor, not high-school gym class, where the same qualities can could get you beat up. Whether it’s intentional or not, it makes it easier for some men to argue that they’ve had to fight to get where they are, and that anyone who fails to achieve what they have simply isn’t good enough.