We Got New Motion City Soundtrack Thanks to Stephenie Meyers

Motion City Soundtrack

Stephenie Meyers, yes, the author of the Twilight novels, reveals on her blog:

There was this one song by one of my favorite bands—it was such an amazing encapsulation of Edward’s mindset throughout Twilight, the despair and the hope and the despair again. The joy of first love plus the sure knowledge of impending tragedy. Perhaps because it was such a specifically Edwardian song, it never found a place in a Bella-centric movie. So it just sat there, being perfect for a story that was only in my head. The band never released the song. It only existed on an old submissions CD and my personal Midnight Sun playlist. 

I’ve been listening to this song for a decade, all by myself.

When I realized that Midnight Sun was actually going to happen, that I was going to be able to finish it, my mind quickly turned to the playlist. There was pruning to be done, adding, subtracting, searching for songs that captured what I needed… but then this big problem. It wouldn’t be the Midnight Sun playlist without THE song. Which didn’t officially exist.

Skip to the happy ending: with an assist from Alex the Amazing, I was able to get in touch with the band and to my great joy, they were willing to help out. So here is THE song. I hope you love it as much as I do, though I’m not sure that’s possible. From the very excellent band Motion City Soundtrack, I give you Crooked Ways.

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Review: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs

Arcade Fire - The Suburbs

When Arcade Fire won the Album of the Year Grammy for The Suburbs on February 13, 2011, it was legitimately shocking. Sure, the Grammys, as an institution, are known for weird out-of-left-field choices, particularly in the Album of the Year category, where the favorites (either odds-wise or in terms of public or critical sentiment) regularly lose to something a bit more sentimental (think Green Day, Usher, Alicia Keys, and Kanye West all losing to the late Ray Charles in 2005) or maybe just a bit more white (Beyonce’s self-titled smash losing to an unexceptional late-career Beck album in 2015). But The Suburbs was different. There was no precedent for an indie band taking the top prize. A band hadn’t won the award period since U2 and Dixie Chicks won back-to-back in 2006 and 2007. The other contenders were also all gargantuan albums that had spawned at least one ubiquitous, generational hit: Katy Petty’s Teenage Dream, Eminem’s Recovery, Lady Gaga’s The Fame Monster, Lady Antebellum’s Need You Now. Arcade Fire weren’t nobodies: they’d made arguably the second most acclaimed album of the 2000s with 2004’s Funeral (the first most acclaimed being Radiohead’s Kid A), and The Suburbs had even debuted at the top of the Billboard 200. But next to a gaggle of mainstream hit machines, the Canadian indie rock band didn’t stand a chance.

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